Toodles 2013

Eliza Bennett via DesignBoom’s Top 10 Body Art from 2013

Below is a list of some of my favorite end of the year lists from around the web. Enjoy!

Kimchi Queen’s Year in Review including President Park Geun-hye’s views on homosexuality, a piece linked on the Korea Times, and a link in which it is stated that young Koreans are less homophobic than xeonophobic.

According to Artsy, these are the artists to watch in 2014. Chicago’s Theaster Gates is on the list.

DesignBoom always does a series of top ten’s from the year. Here are my favorites from 2013: Top 10 Art Exhibitions (including Do Ho Suh’s three-story installation at the new MMCA in Seoul), Top 10 Cultural Institutions, and, my favorite, Top 10 Body Art. 

New York Times solicited readers for stories about loved ones who passed away in 2013. The stories are beautiful, haunting, and comforting.

Cheers to you! May 2014 be full of wonderful surprises, inspiration, and love!

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Happy Thanksgiving: Rainbow Teen Safe Space

I hope that you are all enjoying full bellies and hearts today. Despite it’s questionable start, Thanksgiving has become a time for celebrating family, friends, and food. My husband and I headed slightly south for a cold weather reprieve (I hope!), bourbon, pie, and the famous Jewsbury mashed potatoes.

Among many things, something for which I’m thankful this year is the Rainbow Teens Safe Space campaign. It is always important to see teens being supported, especially teens who are dangerously marginalized. According to their website, “Korea is a culturally conservative society; therefore, heterosexism and homophobia are prevalent in the homes, schools, religious centers, and streets. Consequently, LGBTQ teens are very likely to be in danger of emotional, verbal, and sometimes physical abuse/violence. As a result, they face psychological problems such as depression, low self-esteem, and high risk of committing suicide. Despite the demand, there are no free counseling centers, hotlines, or shelters in Korea for the LGBTQ teens.” Additional documentation about the project is provided here.

Enjoy your day today!

Contemporary Korean Art Roundup

By North Korean artist, Kouk Kun Son, as part of the DMZ International Installation Art Exhibition (2013)

PARA SITE in Hong Kong just opened Great Crescent: Art and Agitation in the 1960s: Japan, South Korea, and TaiwanPart of the statement about the exhibition reads: “A small essay of comparative art history, this exhibition highlights “anti-art” performative tendencies in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan in the 1960s—a decade of turbulence and transformation worldwide, which was also a critical period in the social and political, as well as cultural and artistic histories of the three neighboring countries.”

The National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea is now open! According to e-flux, “MMCA Seoul will approach citizens as a familiar and inviting museum by leading public-friendly programs, and aspires to be a “comprehensive museum integrating the past and future in the present,” a “central museum for Korean art in enhancing global diversity,” and an “open museum inducing cultural development.” The MMCA website is here. For other contemporary art space in the area click here.

This week thinkers in Korea will be thinking about the Busan Biennale upcoming in 2014: “The Busan Biennale, which is set to celebrate its eighth biennial event in 2014, seeks to explore differentiation strategies in an increasingly competitive global biennale ecosystem and reflect on the characteristics of the ecosystem which can benefit the Busan Biennale and the methods of establishing the system.” via e-flux

A few months ago I wrote a post about art around the DMZ. Projects are continually popping up. Most recently, I ran across DMZ International Installation Art Exhibition (see image above). I found the project via the artist Jung S. Kim who I found through this investment advice.

Sunday Morning Coffee [Masculinity]

Image from Joseph Maida’s series New Natives (Hawai’i)

Huffington Post’s article, “8 Scantily Clad Reasons To Rethink Your Understanding of Masculinity” written by Priscilla Frank. Reviewing Joseph Maida’s photographs, “Far removed from your typical headshot, Maida’s photos capture the wide variety of men who happen to find shelter on the tropical islands, combining blatant sensuality with traditionally masculine and feminine poses.”

Knife and Fork shared an interesting article about male eating disorders posted on Jezebel, “I’m an Alcoholic Dude With an Eating Disorder. Hi.” written by stand-up comedian Jamie Kilstein. In a comedic but poignant tone Kilstein explains, “I would tell people that if they ever did a Behind the Music-type special on me, it would be the lamest one ever. Instead of a heroin or a crack addiction, it would just be me on the road after a gig, naked in a bathtub, surrounded by stuffed crust pizza boxes sobbing into my phone, ‘YOU DON’T KNOW ME!'”

A few weeks ago I wrote an article about the male body in contemporary South Korean art for Art Radar Asia. I touch upon the urger to prefect the body and ways artists alter the actual human figure through their art.

On a different note, take a look at this man’s collection of Barbie dolls!

As I write this post some artists come to mind such as Dutes Miller, this exhibition, and of course some of these dudes. Speaking of, have you seen Ai Weiwei’s latest? According to Art Radar Asia, “… bloody performances, simulated sex and government repression can still provoke art audiences.”

If you’re interested, here’s some recommended reading regarding South Korea and masculinity: Sun Jung’s Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols and Stephen J. Epstein and Rachael M. Joo’s article “Multiple Exposures: Korean Bodies and the Transnational Imagination.”

“Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” (Art Radar)

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As a compliment to my article, “Supplementary Skins”, my most recent post for Art Radar Asia, “Giant cyborgs and miniature humanoids: male nudes in South Korean art” reviews work by Lee Yongbaek, Choi Xooang, Dongwook Lee, Hyungkoo Lee, and Kim Joon. See an excerpt below.

Korea is the male make-up capital of the world and cosmetic surgery for men is becoming increasingly prevalent. For business or for pleasure, Korean men are willing to augment their bodies through means beyond pumping iron and following a stringent diet. This sea change in attitude towards acceptable masculinity has not escaped national or international critical comment: Sun Jung’s book Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yosama, Rain, Oldboy, K-Pop Idols digs deeper into changing Korean masculinity, as does Stephen J. Epstein and Rachael M. Yoo’s article “Multiple Exposures: Korean Bodies and the Transnational Imagination.”

Sunday Morning Coffee [Biggby’s with Bob]

Ariana Russell’s Sail via DesignBoom

DesignBoom says, “American artist Ariana Russell responds to the unique components of her skin to draw painless, temporary, and ephemeral designs on her body, the designs visible just long enough to photograph the results. Russell has a skin condition called dermatographia…” Read more of the DesignBoom article here.

The image above is an oddly appropriate transitional image from today to tomorrow. Today is the last day of my vacation, I move from bright blue lakes and warm wind back to the chilly bustle of Chicago. I’m cleaning out my email at Lansing, Michigan based Biggby Coffee with lukewarm decaf. Our vacation was wonderful but I’m looking forward to getting back to SAIC and some writing projects. Ta-ta, summer! Enjoy the links below!

Edward Hopper in 3-D via DesignBoom.

A human harp via DesignBoom. This reminds me a bit of Miru Kim’s Naked City Spleen.

A stunning reaction to devastation via DesignBoom.

Gwangju Design Biennale opens on September 6. Read a quick intro via e-flux.

What’s coming up at Doosan Gallery in New York and Seoul.

Next time I’m in Seoul I really need to visit this space.